Taos Pueblo

Throughout the Southwest there are thousands of archeological sites with the remains of lost and abandoned homes.  Often whole communities moved or died because of lack of water.  The Taos Pueblo is the exception.  It has been continuously occupied for over a thousand years.  Why? Location, location, location.  This pueblo is nestled up against the Taos Mountains.  Pueblo Peak at 12,305 not only provides a dramatic backdrop to the community, but a steady source of water for the people, animals and crops. 

  photo by David Ehrens

photo by David Ehrens

  Rio Pueblo starts at Blue Lake in the Taos Mountains, runs through the Taos Pueblo and then into the Rio Grande. The log drying racks in front of the pueblo are used for drying corn and other crops.

Rio Pueblo starts at Blue Lake in the Taos Mountains, runs through the Taos Pueblo and then into the Rio Grande. The log drying racks in front of the pueblo are used for drying corn and other crops.

  Kiva oven is still used

Kiva oven is still used

  Adobe showing a bit of age

Adobe showing a bit of age

 As if sent by Central Casting, these free roaming ponies came galloping by for a drink just as we crossed the bridge over the river.

As if sent by Central Casting, these free roaming ponies came galloping by for a drink just as we crossed the bridge over the river.