Half A Tank of Gas - Half a Country

With only half a tank of gas we made it half way around Iceland.  Our day began by the Labrador Sea, exploring a lighthouse atop a massive rock arch that had been carved by the sea. It was blustery, wind blowing at least 30 knots - the kind of breeze that kept us extra cautious near the edge of this stone monolith know as  Dyrholey. But the hike in the wild gusts was absolutely worth it.  A colony of puffins were taking cover and seemed quite used to friendly hikers.  And the view, even in the grayness of the mist, was stunning.  Bands of color: gray green sea, black sand beach, orange and yellow fields.  And this was just the morning.

  A muted palette seen from the top of Dyrholaey (Doorway Hill Island)

A muted palette seen from the top of Dyrholaey (Doorway Hill Island)

  The Puffin Greeter

The Puffin Greeter

  The Puffin Committee

The Puffin Committee

The south coast of Iceland is growing at a great clip.  Over 2 miles of new landmass stretches out into the Labrador Sea- created by glacial melt and volcanic eruptions, it is almost all black sand.  Some of it supports plant life, but much of it is truly a desert that meets the sea.

  Hay field in the middle of a black sand desert

Hay field in the middle of a black sand desert

We drove for several hours in the rain, knowing that there were glaciers just to the left, but out of sight. Happily the the sun made an appearance – complete with a rainbow!

  Rainbow at the end of a glacier field.

Rainbow at the end of a glacier field.